RC2

Cultural Realignment Champion - Realignment Coordinator Partnership


Elements of Success

1. Select Realignment Coordinator(s).
2. Establish Systemic Networks.
3. Integrate Management Teamwork.
4. Open Broad Communications Lines.
5. Normalize Teaming Experience.
6. Initiate High-risk Projects Early-on.
7. Alter Decision-Making Patterns Quickly.
8. Learn from Experiences.
9. Respond to the Numbers.
10. Stay Connected to the Outside.



1. Select Realignment Coordinator(s).

Phase 1 - Jump Start. The initial selection of a Realignment Coordinator may be one of the most critical selections made during this entire process. If time is a critical factor, the selection may be predicated on identifying someone well known in the organization who can make logistical arrangements. Scheduling places for events throughout the first phase (and beyond) will be important initially to establish and maintain momentum. Under ideal conditions, however, it may be more effective to start off with someone who is not well known, but rather has a reputation for neutrality. The selection ought to be someone whom workers will be more apt to place trust and confidence in than will likely occur if a perceived member of the established management team is selected.

Action #1
Choose Realignment Coordinator wisely.

Action #2
Lend legitimate authority to organization development activity.

Action #3
Adopt an attitude of, "Let's FIND OUT!" regarding culture.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 2.


Phase 2 - Getting Organized. If the ideal selection has not already been made, by the end of Phase 2, a shift is recommended. During this phase, it is an imperative that the Realignment Coordinator attend the Cultural Facilitation (CF) course. The primary Champion is encouraged to attend CF graduations as a way of demonstrating support for those who will be close to the front line of cultural change. As people are selected and attend the CF course, the Champion and Coordinator must be on the lookout for people with potential who can expand the Coordinators influence deep into the organization structure. Together the Champion and Coordinator must encourage a diverse and disbursed (across the organization structure) group of course attendees.

Action #1
Empower Realignment Coordinator to take the initiative to do something as soon as the CF course is over.

Action #2
Take a risk with chartering a highly visible change effort early in the process.

Action #3
Test your accessibility to each other (Realignment Champion and Realignment Coordinator) early.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 3.


Phase 3 - Expansion. By the end of Phase 3 each major sub-element of the organization (branch or section, for example) ought to have its own assistant Realignment Coordinator and an emerging group of active Cultural Facilitators who have been school trained. These people must be thinking about the important tasks of sustaining realignment efforts without burning out the same few people who naturally gravitate toward change agent positions. Remember too that Champions will be attending specialized learning events during phase 3 titled: "Leadership and Management in the New Culture (LMNC)." Champions at the middle management and first line supervision level have not yet been completely involved prior to the LMNC except at core realignment sessions, and this is often not complete involvement. New teams must be developed in this phase to fully engage the structured and parallel organizations.

Action #1
Build on early successes.

Action #2
Publish lessons learned.

Action #3
Collect and publish evidence that culture is changing.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 4.


Phase 4 - Replacement Selection. During Phase 4 one or more individuals who have served as assistant realignment coordinators ought to be considered for the prime Realignment Coordinator position in the organization. The duties of this position are arduous and it would be unfair to continue the same person in this position indefinitely. Additionally, by the end of Phase 4, another data collection effort will have been completed, giving birth to new priorities which will provide direction for the new prime Realignment Coordinator in filling that role.

Action #1
Pass the Realignment Coordinator role to the next generation.

Action #2
Review and re-practice the process of selecting actions indicated by the new data from the UHS Survey.

Action #3
Build a new strong relationship between Realignment Champion and Realignment Coordinator.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 5.

Phase 5 - Transition. During Phase 5 it is important that Realignment Coordinator and Facilitator roles and teams shift effectively. New people should be considered for new positions, while others who have not been involved at all must be sent to training so they too can take an active and effective role in the process. The Sustainment efforts of Phase 5 should prompt a reinvention so that a new "S-Curve" can begin a system renewal precisely when needed--at least one catalyst for which will be newly assigned people to these key positions.

Action #1
Be intentional about how the recruitment of new talent is done.

Action #2
Be aware that yesterday's success becomes today's "good old days" as the next cycle through the Basic Model begins.

Action #3
Normalize for all employees the continuous process of organization development and the rhythm of the organizational pulse.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to review selection criteria for internal change agents.



2. Establish Systemic Networks.

Phase 1 - System Logistics. The first Phase 1 primary event is an all-hands orientation so that everyone in the organization will have an opportunity to learn first-hand what cultural realignment is all about. Our experience suggests that many people will have a preconceived notion and that some will attend the orientation sessions in disbelief (they will hear what they came to hear rather than what is actually said). The second major Phase 1 event as an all-hands data Fair during which data collection results are displayed for everyone to see and ask questions about. Realignment Coordinators will schedule facilities and coordinate distribution and collection of information packages. These activities will require a network of people able to make things happen quickly and efficiently. Where necessary, Champions must be quick to introduce newly assigned Realignment Coordinators to those who will support this effort. In some cases, the Champion may not be in the best position to make these introductions and must rely on others to assist this "making connections" effort.

Action #1
Identify people who can make things happen.

Action #2
Mobilize the line of legitimate authority to support the network.

Action #3
Build ownership in Champion's purpose for realignment when resistance appears.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 2.


Phase 2 - Through the Hierarchy - The Parallel-Convergent Organization. As core phases are initiated and realignment work progresses through an organization it will become imperative that a chain of congruent relationships develop that enable both a reliable dissemination and collection of information that will help the cultural realignment process succeed. Often, in the initial stages of realignment this network will cause some fracture in existing relations. Care must be take to minimize these fractures and enable them to be healed over the course of the first year. Partnering between Realignment Champions and Realignment Coordinators can be strengthened as they strategize how to meet the resistance as it emerges. Cultural Facilitators will be bringing the Beliefs Set to life deep into the fabric of the organization under the direction of the Champion and prime Realignment Coordinator. The parallel organization begins to develop during the first iteration, and it must be converged effectively by year's end. Often resistance emerges among those in the line-of-authority since their human resources are being directed to activities other than the ones they control. Resentment is apt to bog things down unless the Champion is able to help overcome it. The networks that result from these experiences become an integral part of realignment success and have much to do with the quality of the relationship between the prime Champion and Realignment Coordinator.

Action #1
Be clear from the outset that the parallel organization does not undermine the legitimate line of authority but is instead a vital resource for the line of authority.

Action #2
Develop skill and confidence between the Champion and the Realignment Coordinator in dealing with conflict and resentment.

Action #3
Understand that venting feelings in a proper forum where respect for diverse points of view is present is a natural first step toward alignment.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 3.


Phase 3 - Crossing-boundaries. As Strategy is developed and prioritized within each mission area it must be effectively integrated between organizational elements. Realignment Coordinators and Cultural Facilitators are in an ideal position to accomplish this task of implementing strategic initiatives across organizational boundaries when effectively chartered by the prime Champion. Additionally, the specialized organizational learning that occurs in Phases 2 and 3 at the Cultural Facilitation course and the "Leadership and Management in the New Culture" (LMNC) event forms a perfect bridge for breaking down dysfunctional organization boundaries. The Champion, Cultural Realignment Coordinator, and Cultural Facilitation assets of the organization are an imperative to accelerate this happening.

Action #1
Charter focus groups to address elements of strategy that affect more than one subgroup of the organization.

Action #2
Have facilitated staff meetings and facilitated employee forums to give everyone an opportunity to discuss what is important.

Action #3
Discuss with focus groups, regular line of authority staff and parallel organization "officials" what went well and what could be improved about your work together clarifying strategies in each mission area.

Action #4
Capture "lessons learned" and share them in different subgroups of the organization.

Action #5
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 4.


Phase 4 - Integrating the Customer. Having developed and prioritized as set of integrated strategies in Phase 3, it will be time to involve customers in the final detailing of work. The Champion must be prepared to engage the customer base in this effort in order to make good on a promise of more responsive products and services. The Cultural Realignment Coordinators must manage the internal culture to assure that customer desires are tempered with a realistic cultural capacity to perform effectively and efficiently.

Action #1
Unite the parallel organization and the legitimate line of authority around the Phase 4 alignment task of having everyone in the organization aware of how daily work flows around the Beliefs Set and the Strategy Bridge.

Action #2
Be intentional about soliciting customer feedback.

Action #3
Be intentional about using the re-survey of all hands as a cultural "snapshot" to measure the return on investment of the realignment work to date.

Action #4
Consider the resources of realignment to include (a) internal change agents in the parallel organization; (b) leaders and managers in the legitimate line of authority; (c) customers-the network is growing/dynamic.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 5.


Phase 5 - Inter-System Connections. During the Sustainment efforts of Phase 5, the Champion and Realignment Coordinator team becomes a primary catalyst for integrating across systems (to other client organizations) for the purpose of learning and continuous performance and cultural improvement. Having made successful efforts toward the customer base, it may be appropriate to turn some attention to vendors and suppliers. Certainly the environmental scan teams normally activated during Phase 5 will be loaded with information about what the future holds for the industry within which the organization currently resides and will be able to distribute that information throughout the organization.

Action #1
Take steps to maintain the network you have built!

Action #2
Look for opportunities to let the network grow-include vendors, stakeholders-and be open to learning and adapting to the environmental challenges that approach.

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com for review of the 5 phases as you "recycle" according to your organizational pulse.



3. Integrate Management Teamwork.

Phase 1 - Acknowledgement. Resistance can be expected in any system at the first iteration of Phase 1. Managers and supervisors have a vested interest in the system in whatever state it is as the cultural realignment effort begins. If the system is not well off, the resistance may take the form of resentment or even potential embarrassment. The current management team must be acknowledged, and they must be able to acknowledge that the work they have done was not necessarily right or wrong. That work had neither all bad nor all good results. The Champion and Realignment Coordinator must have a no-fault attitude toward the current team as they launch into a potential corrective action. There must also be an acknowledgement that "culture" does not belong to management, and cannot be changed by management. Management can be a powerful catalyst in that effort, however.

Action #1
Take the initiative to model the importance of facilitated "venting" sessions for managers in addition to the venting process that is included in the core events of the realignment effort.

Action #2
Begin the language of "lessons learned" early and reward learning as often as you reward achievement during this phase.

Action #3
Solicit input from the current management team as you move to act on changes in the culture. Remind them that the culture does not belong to management and cannot be changed by management.

Action #4
Remind managers that they have power to influence the culture and that people will watch them for congruence between what they say and what they do about cultural alignment.

Action #5
Consult www.ltodi.com as you prepare for Phase 2.


Phase 2 - Preparing Special Assistants. The Champion and Realignment Coordinator are encouraged jointly to present to the current management team the need for training assistants that can help change the culture of the organization. Naturally, the best alternative is that the current managers and supervisors will nominate potential Cultural Facilitators for these courses. Volunteers are also encouraged and will require supervisors' support in order to be successful.

Action #1
Ask current managers to nominate candidates to become internal change agents. Keep in mind the criteria of someone who is politically neutral who has credibility in the organization.

Action #2
Be aware that if unpopular people or people who have personal agendas become associated with the Realignment effort, the cultural change process may be delayed because of "guilt by association."

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com to get ideas about ad hoc teams that may be formed to place people who have a wish to be part of the Realignment effort in places where there talents will match the work they are needed to do.


Phase 3 - Realigning Leaders and Managers. In Phase 3 all those in leadership, management, or supervisory positions (and those who are about to enter those positions) are invited to an event titled: Leadership and Management in the New Culture (LMNC). Invitations must be supported with strong encouragement from the Champion in order to be effective. Once the course is completed, the prime Champion must model new behaviors and priorities and monitor others to assure they are doing the same. The Realignment Coordinator must watchful to assure that the Champion is aware of who attends and who does not.

Action #1
Champion makes a new way of doing business a clear priority and encourages the management team to be "in."

Action #2
Realignment Coordinator and Champion designate some regular time to confer with each other and work on pulling together (shared priorities) about the next steps for the organization.

Action #3
Include and invite and encourage participation from leaders and managers.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com for tips on carrying the strategies on down through the organization to the work regimen level.


Phase 4 - Adjusting the Work. During the core events some work will be identified as low priority or work that ought to be discontinued. Those close to the work are the ones that will either make the adjustments to work happen or ignore the new priorities of a new organization culture. First line supervisors will have their turn at resisting change if they have not already. Some of the people who are influential will be in a management position, others will be once removed from direct involvement. In all cases, mechanisms must be put into place that will "track" work adjustments to assure they are in line with new directions. Realignment Coordinators must be concerned with the metrics of change while the Champions must be involved with assuring work performance and cultural realignment.

Action #1
Use "My Cultural Realignment Notebook" to collect the Beliefs Set and Strategy Bridge documents and to begin to identify process owners for the major work processes in each organization.

Action #2
Use process flow diagrams to have a dialogue about continuous process improvement. The cultural implications of this process dialogue may exceed the value of the process diagrams as a product in the ISO9000 sense.

Action #3
Communicate, communicate, communicate. Both Champion and Realignment Coordinators are messengers whose redundant story about why we are doing organization development work is a vital part of the organizational "lore" and should be repeated as often as necessary until everyone acts familiar with the concepts of improving performance, productivity, innovation, and profitability.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to FIND OUT answers to the "Why?" questions that will be coming from those who are just getting tuned into the realignment process.


Phase 5 - Developing Tolerance. As the organization enters the Sustainment period of Phase 5, management tolerance to change and adaptability must be enhanced. This adaptability must manifest itself in a learning approach to the examination of data from the data collection effort characteristically completed between Phase 4 and Phase 5. An important use for the "new" data will be determining the new priorities. These new priorities may have shifted from the previous year. Managers and supervisors must be ready and willing to shift emphasis along with those priorities in order to respond well to the environment within which the organization must fit.

Action #1
Managers need to be involved in the environmental scanning activity to increase their ownership in the forecasting of the next wave of change coming their way.

Action #2
Both Champions and Realignment Coordinators can cite the familiarity of this process of re-looking at the Beliefs, re-looking at the Strategies, and re-prioritizing the initiatives. They can help the organization begin to think in terms of "our annual cultural priority check up" and normalize the rhythm of the organizational pulse.

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com for reinforcement of the concept of becoming a "learning organization."



4. Open Broad Communications Lines.

Phase 1 - All-Hands Orientations. Both wide distribution of literature and specific face-to-face meetings available to all personnel characterize Phase 1. Data Fairs lay all the cards on the table and provide a mechanism to talk deliberately about what needs to be done over the next year. Champions and Realignment Coordinators must be present to emphasize the importance of this project. When possible they must take part in the presentation of the data.

Action #1
Model to all personnel that questions about the data are welcome and that your approach to this cultural snapshot is that it will be used to make positive changes.

Action #2
Issue an invitation for the first chartered team to address an item of general concern (see Trend Tower bottom 5 list).

Action #3
Offer encouragement to anyone interested in Cultural Facilitation education.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for Phase 2.

Phase 2 - Facilitated Meetings. As soon as Cultural Facilitators are available in any part of the organization having regularly scheduled meetings, those meetings ought to be facilitated by a trained team of Cultural Facilitators. This facilitation mandate ought to be initiated by the prime Champion and metrics developed for the Champion by the Realignment Coordinator. As confidence is gained, post-meeting clinics must become the norm in an effort to continuously improve performance and to practice another way of discussing important things in an open forum.

Action #1
The Champion should be the first to have facilitated meetings in as many conspicuous ways as possible. The Champion and the Realignment Coordinator might facilitate some meetings together as a team to enhance their knowledge of what is involved in that lead/anchor teamwork.

Action #2
The Realignment Coordinator as "team leader" of the organization's Cultural Facilitators (CFs) has the job of helping the CFs maintain enthusiasm as they begin to apply their skills "in the trenches."

Action #3
Both Champion and Realignment Coordinator can look for evidence that facilitation makes a difference in the meetings where it is used and publish their findings.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com for more information about facilitation and about identifying potential facilitators.


Phase 3 - Open and Invitational forums. Traditional meetings, characterized by "information out," patterns must be replaced with facilitated open forums during which everyone in attendance addresses important topics. It is typical that initial meetings of this type will meet resistance, but resistance must not deter the Champion. The Realignment Coordinator can do much to prepare for the open meeting by collecting difficult topics in advance, and acting as the agent for those unable or unwilling to voice their legitimate concerns in an open forum.

Action #1
Schedule employee forums on their turf.

Action #2
Consider using external facilitators when content is of vital interest to all trained facilitators internal to the organizational unit.

Action #3
Consider using professional facilitators when emotions run high until internal trained facilitators develop their skills in conflict management.

Action #4
Publicize the availability of forum opportunities and encourage attendance there.

Action #5
Consult www.ltodi.com to prepare for facilitating forums.


Phase 4 - Public Displays of Data and Information. Not all communications have to be of the open forum type. In many cases, just the posting of information or data in a public place so that people can have access to it is an important step in opening up communications patterns. The Realignment Coordinator must work with any webmaster assigned in the organization to accomplish open communications using electronic means whenever possible. Other displays such as bulletin boards or data displays in the organization will also serve a useful purpose. Some information may be driven to its intended destination by pre-established criteria determined by the end user. Other information must be "loaded" in smart categorical delivery systems so that it can effortlessly travel from those who have it to those who want or need it. Such a system is culturally smart.

Action #1
Charter a focus group or team effort to address the information flow symptoms that exist in your organization. Consult the survey for clues from the data gathered.

Action #2
Recognize and reward successes that people have improving information flow.

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com to increase the amount of realignment information at your disposal.


Phase 5 - Assisted Migration to Work (Balancing the Workload). A new task for leadership and management in the new culture is being able to publish work-related requirements so that workers (regardless of status or position) can migrate to required work successfully. It must become primarily a "pull" system rather than a "push" system. The Champion must be prepared and actually sanction such a system without relinquishing control of priorities, and the Realignment Coordinator in cooperation with others in the line-of-authority must be a catalyst in allowing the right person to migrate to the right work with minimal effort.

Action #1
Take a risk with a high visibility "pilot" project to demonstrate how migration to work occurs.

Action #2
Adopt a long term perspective when work load priorities are negotiated.

Action #3
Measure the cultural results of attraction-based workload balancing as well as the "product or service" produced by the work. Publish your cultural metrics.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com for information on standard ad hoc teams that will help cover all aspects of work during this time of more fluidity in the organization.



5. Normalize Teaming Experience.

Phase 1 - Initiate a New Pattern. Every trend in the organization development arena points to the fact that teams and teaming are here to stay. Anyone thinking that learning team-related skills is here today and gone tomorrow has missed the boat. Right from the start in Phase 1, we form a data collection team to determine survey items, and we insist that supervisors and managers are not on the team. We like to have the team a fully volunteer group. We don't mind, in fact welcome, a few cynics. We are strong advocates that teams remain leaderless as long as possible by letting the facilitation team play a surrogate leadership role until the group members get an opportunity to learn each other's style and compatibility. We also advocate that whoever charters the team be prepared to implement the team's recommendations and further draft team members onto the implementation phase. The prime Champion and all Champions must demonstrate their commitment to this new way of doing business from the start or as quickly as possible once the project unfolds.

Action #1
Build on everyone's prior experience with teams.

Action #2
Be clear about how this kind of teamwork is different from prior experience.

Action #3
Back up the team charter with the expectation that their recommendations will be followed.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com glossary for the new language of teamwork.


Phase 2 - Provide Ample Opportunity. Initial data is designed to prioritize potential team opportunities. The top five team assignments are normally identified by the data reports. Typically, as these symptoms are followed to a root cause, additional team opportunities arise that can be easily assigned by the Champion and monitored by the Realignment Coordinator.

Action #1
Use the Trend Tower from your data report to identify the 5 items people are the most concerned about.

Action #2
Form a team for each item (unless they are related and point to two or three similar concerns. Ask for volunteers and recruit team members for balance.

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com whenever you want to stimulate your thinking about teams.


Phase 3 - Balance the Teams Deliberately. Whenever possible balance the teams with as many demographics as possible. Mix the gender, racial backgrounds, education, structural assignments, and the RGB predispositions. If need be, allow any team the option to draft the members needed (workload permitting). Not everyone serving on a team must have completed the Cultural Facilitation event, but enough team players should be assigned to teams to normalize team behaviors. The Realignment Coordinator ought to maintain records of who is on the various teams and records of attendance. Plans to overcome burnout and routinely optimistic or pessimistic members on teams should be evaluated periodically. We believe strongly that the price of organizational citizenship is team activity to work on and increase the capacity of the organization's culture. In the absence of sufficient volunteers, the Champion ought to press people into compatible service beginning at Phase 3 with recommendations from the Realignment Coordinator.

Action #1
Publish team successes.

Action #2
Publish lessons learned about teamwork.

Action #3
Recognize both successes and lessons learned as equally valuable to the organization.

Action #4
Collect evidence that your plans for more employee involvement in decision-making are becoming integrated into the organization culture.

Action #5
Send others to www.ltodi.com to answer their questions.


Phase 4 - Provide Central Coordination. By Phase 4 there ought to be an abundance of teams in operation. Coordinating the efforts of these teams and being certain that none are overlooked is a primary responsibility of the Realignment Coordinator. The Champion must inquire as to team progress on a regular basis.

Action #1
Establish a routine of Recruit, Choose Facilitation Team, Charter, Flow Team Process (taking into account interim reports to Champion and evaluation).

Action #2
Make a clinic at the end of each session a standard routine for the facilitation team.

Action #3
Lead the team through a reflection on their process at significant junctures so that eventually the culture includes the notion of clinic as a standard way of capturing successes and lessons learned.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com for more about "Post-Event Clinics."


Phase 5 - Publish Learnings. As teams become common in the new culture, the learnings that results ought to be published and transferred from one initiative to another. The Realignment Coordinator is the ideal source for this archive of learning.. Learnings ought to be published at Cultural Realignment Exchange opportunities so that "fertilization" can happen across the organization.

Action #1
The value of learning can be greatly enhanced in the organization if the Champion asks on an ongoing basis, "What did we learn here?"

Action #2
The Realignment Coordinator can prompt the question, "What did we learn here?" by taking on the mission of holding up learning as a primary benefit of organization development work and by publishing as often as possible and in as many arenas as possible the evidence that is accumulating.

Action #3
Remember the resource www.ltodi.com is at your disposal!



6. Initiate High Risk Projects Early-on.

Phase 1 - Tackle Tough Issues. Pay attention to the data from the first opportunity. Use the prioritization of issues from your Trend Tower to assign teams without regard to how tough the issue might be. Take some early risk to show a high yield dividend from the start. The Realignment Coordinator can help prepare the early charters for team involvement. The Champion must be aggressive to get things underway. If the issues are too hot to handle with internal facilitators, ask for external support.

Action #1
Choose the high risk worth taking!

Action #2
Put fear of failure on the back burner and hold on to your confidence that this demonstration of the benefits of this way of doing business will teach the organization a valuable lesson.

Action #3
Talk about learning together as an important value.

Action #4
Reinforce what you learned about teamwork and about the issue after this risk has become part of the organization's history.

Action #5
Don't wait too long to begin planning the next risk worth taking!

Action #6
Remember, the resource www.ltodi.com is there for you!


Phase 2 - Confront Decision Norms. As the values are clarified in Phase 2, they are used to stabilize decisions across the organization. As difficult decisions are faced, the Champion must be the first and most fierce advocate for decisions-by-values as stated in the Beliefs Set. The Realignment Coordinator must assist by ensuring stories concerning decision pattern alterations are made visible in the organization.

Action #1
Use frequent references to the Beliefs Set in your discussions around decisions to be made.

Action #2
Bring up for re-examination any values that you notice are not relevant in your discussions around decisions to be made.

Action #3
Repeat as often as you find appropriate those examples of when the Beliefs Set impacted a decision and kept you true to your course.

Action #4
Look at the Beliefs Set material ( www.ltodi.com ) to refresh your memory about why moving together in the same direction is so important for your flock.


Phase 3 - Implement Prioritized Strategic Initiatives. It is always difficult to abandon a strategy that is in place. Often, current strategies are not well articulated and have become a matter of habit rather than a matter of deliberate intention. As Phase 3 clarifies strategic initiatives (new things that ought to be done), The Champion must make assignments so that strategic initiatives will have a shepherd. The Realignment Coordinator must see to it that strategies are clear and accessible to everyone in the organization and that people understand how their work each day fits with the prioritized strategic initiatives as published.

Action #1
Rely on your learning about teamwork to view the Strategic Initiative Shepherd as the team leader and process owner for that particular initiative.

Action #2
Develop the ProZones between the Champion, the Realignment Coordinator and the Shepherd so that their teamwork will be high quality.

Action #3
Create a schedule for interim reporting on the strategies that are being worked so that the entire organization stays informed.

Action #4
Plan to refer people to www.ltodi.com when they need reminding that the strategies are the methods of living out the beliefs in each mission area. The glossary will also help for such terms as "ProZone."


Phase 4 - Aggressively Develop and Use Metrics. Measuring performance and culture is a high-risk venture. Yet establishing metrics is essential to an improvement effort. The Champion and Realignment Coordinator must develop and use metrics on their own major processes as an example to people in their organization. Publishing results widely in the organization of both their successes and failures is an important step in getting others involved. Fundamental performance metric suggestions have been developed for all phases and are available on the "ltodi" web-site. We recommend that internal metrics be developed and used before using metrics that deal directly with customer service.

Action #1
Use the UHS survey annually for a "check-up" on culture.

Action #2
Consult www.ltodi.com for specific suggestions about performance metrics by phase.

Action #3
Ask the question, "How did we do?" as often as you can, and follow that question with, "How are we measuring that?" to increase awareness about the importance of metrics.


Phase 5 - Continuously Question the Status Quo. Adaptability adds strength and vitality to an organization's culture. Increased cultural capacity is a direct product of developing tolerance for change. Organizations that have come through chaos are likely to settle down into a new rhythm and resist change unless change is self- generated deliberately. We advocate a continuous examination (with reasonable and intentional resting periods built in) of the status quo to insure developing strong adaptability and innovation skills in the organization. An ideal time to reinvent is during natural growth periods when energy is high, not when the organization settles into another slump. The Champion must insist on these foundational concepts when on-going, long-term investment in cultural capacity is desired.

Action #1
Develop a regular schedule of "reinvention."

Action #2
Talk about the value of planned change rather than sudden forced change based on an unanticipated crisis.

Action #3
Check out material on the pulse of an organization at the www.ltodi.com site.



7. Alter Decision-Making Patterns Quickly.

Phase 1 - Use Data Collaboratively. Culture will rarely change appreciably in the absence of an altered decision-making pattern. Using data driven decision-making techniques in a collaborative process will accelerate culture change in a desirable direction. When Champions charter a team to make a recommendation, there must be a strong (very strong) probability that the recommendation will be accepted quickly and implemented. We advocate that the Champion retain most of the team in place to implement the recommendation they make when accepted. In addition, we advocate that teams use an open system to gain members through volunteer mechanisms whenever possible to ensure highly collaborative processes. This effort to recruit volunteer teams, self-selected by interest in the issue, begins with the data collection team and continues throughout the project.

Action #1
Cite your data as a rationale for collaborative decision-making.

Action #2
Ideally, Champions would say to the teams they charter, "My intention is to DO what you recommend."

Action #3
Champions can seed the charter with the possibility that the team will continue to participate in the implementation of their recommendations.

Action #4
Realignment Coordinators can collaborate with Champions to choose priorities for action from the items the data delivers for consideration.


Phase 2 - Establish Value-based Template. During Phase 2, the Beliefs Set establishes values that are to be used to add continuity to decision-making across the organization structure. With this effort, management must place added confidence in decisions that are made without their direct involvement insisting only that sound judgment and reliance on the value-based template be used. Managers ought to be making fewer decisions. And workers ought to be making decisions that rely on their expertise as a decision-making foundation. Champions at all levels in the organization ought to be aware of the consistency brought to organizational decisions through the application of the value-based template. Realignment Coordinators must collect information concerning the Return-on-Investment in time and quality of decisions based on this value-based template.

Action #1
Get used to the process of checking the decisions you are making against the values you state in the Beliefs Set.

Action #2
Consider the Purpose, Values, Missions and Vision as guides that are relevant to today's work, not as relics that sit on a shelf.

Action #3
Consult www.ltodi.com for more material on each of the elements in the Beliefs Set.


Phase 3 - Develop Prioritized Strategies. As priorities shift, and strategic initiatives are implemented, Champions must check on progress at regular meetings and hold appropriate individuals and groups accountable for achieving strategic goals. Realignment Coordinators must gather consolidated records to reflect progress and report on cultural change results periodically while responsible program managers report on performance results. An important issue in adopting new programs is the notion that something's got to fall off the full plate. It will be the job of Champions and Realignment Coordinators to assure that the rights things are considered for discontinuance.

Action #1
Listen to the Realignment Coordinator as the reporting agent for the status of the cultural initiatives and to the program managers as the reporting agents for the performance initiatives.

Action #2
Insist that some of your current work fit in each category--Start, Stop, Change, Continue-as an exercise in prioritizing what is going on now.

Action #3
Insist that something must stop before something new can start.

Action #4
Consult www.ltodi.com for definition of "culture" as new people start asking.


Phase 4 - Prioritize Essential Work. Core programs are identifiable for all major structural elements in an organization. Once these core programs have been identified, they must be documented, clarified, and continually improved. The Champion must validate the top priorities and oversee the progress in the documentation and continuous improvement effort. Realignment Coordinators must collect and report on cultural metrics associated with these programs regularly.

Action #1
Identify major programs worthy of continuous improvement.

Action #2
Chart the flow of each program.

Action #3
Solicit agreement from everyone involved in the program that the flow is accurate. It is crucial that ownership in the flow is felt by all involved persons.

Action #4
Use the flow diagram as a catalyst to examine unexpected occurrences. Discuss the flow diagram without fear. The flow diagram belongs to the team or work group, because everyone involved as agreed and participated in the flow documentation. A breakdown in flow is a issue, not an individual failure.

Action #5
Cite www.ltodi.com as a resource for people who have questions about flow diagrams as culture-building tools.


Phase 5 - Practice Continuous Adjustment. The Champion is the focal point in the organization for acquiring information about issues and programs that will have an impact on the way business is done. Other subject matter experts will also contribute to data gathering. This information must be reviewed centrally by the Environmental Scan Team for impact and recommendations. The Champion must consult this group on a recurring basis.

Action #1
Before beginning the Sustainment effort of Phase 5 Champions and Realignment Coordinators can prepare by consulting www.ltodi.com material on Ad Hoc Teams by phase.

Action #2
Charter the Environmental Scan Team.

Action #3
Listen to their findings.

Action #4
Develop a forum where they can share their findings with the entire organization.



8. Learn from Experiences.

Phase 1 - Data Fair. Each Data Fair will produce specific learnings. The facilitation team must collect and publish learnings in an effort to improve performance and culture in subsequent events. The Champion must report on those learnings and the Realignment Coordinator must distribute them across the organization in some way that others can benefit from them. Under ideal conditions, people would validate the learnings with an appropriate feedback method.

Action #1
Ask often, "What have we learned here?"

Action #2
Share the answers to the "What have we learned?" question you got in one place in another place-broadcast the learnings, so that people can learn from each other's learnings.


Phase 2 - Beliefs Set. When the Beliefs Set is initially established and when it is revisited annually, learning ought to be collected and published in an effort to strengthen the process by which organization direction is attained and sustained. The Champion must be the primary reporter of learnings across the entire organization.

Action #1
Ask, "What have we learned since the last time?"

Action #2
Ask, "What else have we learned?"

Action #3
Periodically, meet with the Realignment Coordinator and ask, "What evidence do we have that the learning is sticking?"


Phase 3 - Strategy Bridge. As strategic initiatives shift learning must be captured that pertains to performance as well as to the impact on organization culture. The impact of discontinuing strategic initiatives as well as beginning fresh initiatives must be thought out and reported by the Champion.

Action #1
Ground yourself in a sense of organizational history. Today's strategic initiative might be yesterday's try that didn't work. Yesterday's failed attempt may be the very idea whose time has come.

Action #2
Support forums where the organizational history can be shared. Awareness of several past attempts may increase the sense of possibility for people who are used to thinking in terms of "We've always done it this way."

Action #3
Collaborate with the Realignment Coordinator to determine impact of starting something or stopping something. Decide together whether involving others (a team) in impact analysis is wise.


Phase 4 - Work Regimen. As learnings emerge during Phase 4, the Realignment Coordinator must be mindful that economies can be attained from one work group to another by sharing of successes and failures. Well working processes developed may be easily adaptable to other areas in the organization. The Champion and Realignment Coordinator must be aware that their eyes are likely the most effective in spotting these learnings.

Action #1
Cross-fertilize news of successes and lessons learned in all corners of the organization.

Action #2
Recognize learning in all the forms it takes!

Action #3
Look at www.ltodi.com to enhance your own learning about organization development.


Phase 5 - Sustainment. One of the most important issues addressed in the Sustainment effort is, "What have we learned, and how can we apply that learning to improve performance during the next iteration of this process?" During Sustainment it is the Champion's job to report on the state of culture realignment and offer some insight into what might be done better in the future. The Champion's status report must be supported by the Realignment Coordinator's records and collected wisdom from each phase completed.

Action #1
Think about your realignment effort as a walk through the quadrants of the Basic Model. Talk with the organization about this journey and about how to recognize the next cycle of that same journey.

Action #2
Send people with questions about the Basic Model to www.ltodi.com for a review.



9. Watch and Respond to the Numbers.

Phase 1 - Data Collection Results. Enormous effort goes into collecting data to determine the status of an organization's culture. The items are interesting, and they are essential signposts that point to areas where improvements are needed (essential). Systemic trends become apparent and are automatically prioritized. Symptoms are highlighted and are often easily problem-solved. If data collection results are ignored, the organization is headed for trouble. A prime responsibility of the Champion is to keep both the systemic trends and individual elements in full view to assure proper attention is given to improving both. Realignment Coordinators can easily advise on the necessity to charter teams to identify and resolve problems and must take that responsibility seriously.

Action #1
Learn the Unifying Human Systems (UHS) model in sufficient detail to talk about it with sub-groups of your organization.

Action #2
Encourage familiarity with the UHS model among managers, Cultural Realignment Coordinator, and Cultural Facilitators as they become available, by sending them to www.ltodi.com for a reference.

Action #3
Gather data informally from time to time by polling people about their opinions of one (or more) or the UHS elements.

Action #4
Keep track of the number of questions from the survey that you address by chartering teams and focus groups.


Phase 2 - Involvement. Sufficient people must be involved in the culture realignment project for it to accomplish its outcomes. Approximately one third positive involvement of the workforce will be required to overcome poor cultural attributes eventually. As the organization approaches 100% involvement cultural change is assured. The Realignment Coordinator must watch involvement numbers to assure the maximum impact. Moreover, the Realignment Coordinator can determine if the "demographics of involvement" will produce the desired results. If only people with a positive outlook toward culture attend events, little change is likely to occur. If sufficient diversity is not involved, change will be slow or perhaps even counterproductive.

Action #1
Collect attendance data for realignment activities and analyze data for diversity, representation of subgroups of the organization, and total workforce percentage.

Action #2
Mention the attendance data regularly as improvements in involvement occur. Recognize the value of having all factions present in the forum that organization development work offers the organization.

Action #3
Ask the question, "Are the right people here?" Re-convene after the right people are gathered, if the answer is "No."

Action #4
If people ask, "Why are we doing this?", send them to www.ltodi.com frequently asked questions section.


Phase 3 - New Imperatives. If the organization does not commit to undertaking strategic initiatives that will produce a desired yield, one can predict stagnation and ultimate deterioration. If the commitment is there but sufficient attention is not paid the strategic initiatives, the Champion ranks need to move into appropriate action. Numbers can be developed to determine whether there is congruence between assigned priority of strategic initiative and DOING something about the strategic initiative. Once the numbers have been determined, they must be watched and responded to accordingly.

Action #1
Construct measures of accountability. Progress on performance initiatives may be easier to measure than progress on culture initiatives.

Action #2
See www.ltodi.com for culture metrics suggestions.


Phase 4 - Core Process Clarity. As processes are flow chart diagrammed and clarified through narrative, metrics are more easily assigned. Clarity about processes and metrics about performance will call attention to those areas that will return a favorable result to the organization. The Realignment Coordinator must keep the metrics and the Champion must be prepared to follow through with actions that the numbers indicate will be necessary.

Action #1
Measure!

Action #2
Evaluate which measures are important and should impact decisions.

Action #3
Encourage continuous improvement by discussing process flow openly and agreeing on how it can be made better.

Action #4
Hold each other accountable to follow the agreed upon process or change the agreement.

Action #5
Recognize clarity of process and share successes across the organization.


Phase 5 - No Surprise Scenario. It is the Champion along with assistance from the Environmental Scan Team who will predict an organization future into which the organization must fit. The two variables determining success are (a) how the organization responds, and (b) how accurate that picture can be calculated. Metrics will detail the degree to which the organization is doing what it forecast it ought to do. The "how responsive" question will be answered by how well the organization sustains the momentum of continuous cultural realignment. A decision to continue cultural realignment work may depend on the Return-on-Investment (ROI) calculation.

Action #1
Prepare for gathering ROI data in Phase 1.

Action #2
Consult www.ltodi.com for Phase 5 process preparation and implementation.



10. Stay Connected to the Outside.

Phase 1 - Data Collection and Interpretation. Having an outside resource collect and interpret the data used to make decisions about the cultural capacity of the organization is an imperative. Internal collection will always yield a more favorable metric that an outside collection mechanism. Although internal means must always be used to validate the data, an external source is an invaluable resource in providing an impartial view. Only the Champion can engage those outside resources for the organization.

Action #1
Choose objective data collection.

Action #2
Champion the investment you have chosen in diagnosing the organization culture.


Phase 2 - Impartial View. An outside resource can best provide feedback or ask difficult questions about the organization without fear of cultural reprisal. Often people in an organization want to do the right thing or ask the right question but hesitate to do so for fear their candor may cause them or their career damage. The Champion alone can commission an outside resource to fully play this vital role.

Action #1
Be determined to FIND OUT.

Action #2
Model a form or inquiry that helps the difficult issues emerge and helps avoid a "sweeping problems under the rug" attitude.


Phase 3 - Cultural Insights and Experience. An outside resource brings with it the experience gained from similar organizations, thus saving time and effort in an exploratory process. There is no other way to achieve this level of insight and experience. Internal organization development practitioners eventually minimize this capability by staying "inside" the organization culture they serve.

Action #1
Choose to benefit from the lessons learned elsewhere as well as from the lessons learned inside your organization.

Action #2
Check the list of clients served (www.ltodi.com) to assess the O.D.I. experience base.


Phase 4 - Shortcuts. Experience from outside the organization enables people to learn what they need quickly from a practical base rather than a theoretical one. Learnings from an industry are easily transferred from one organization to another with minimal loss and maximum economy.

Action #1
Listen for examples of practical strategies that have succeeded elsewhere.

Action #2
Ask about trends in organization development that might benefit your organization.

Action #3
Feedback to O.D.I. any information you would like to find on www.ltodi.com and do not see there.


Phase 5 - Confidence and Consistency. Client Champions have noted regularly that they feel they are buying a guide that provides their organization with confidence that cultural realignment is possible and deliberate. They have found a system that brings consistency across their organization and assurance that the job can be done on-time and within budget.

Action #1
Ask about satisfied clients who have reached the Sustainment Phase and who are available as resources.

Action #2
Connect with client web sites highlighted at www.ltodi.com and continue your own quest for confidence and consistency.


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